Testimonials

Mary Anne Gale’s direct and actionable approach to navigating corporate politics was some of the best advice I have ever been given. Using her approach to relationship building and seeking out career advocates has helped me advance in my career at a faster pace than my peers.

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– Justin McDowell
  Enterprise Architect – Sun Chemical Corporation

The CareerScape Blog

Posted By: Mary Anne Gale

People often ask me, “How were you able to have it all?”  I am always stunned by the question because “all” means different things to everyone.  “All” is society’s definition of success.  For many people, “all” means that you have had a successful career, family life, and community or social life, as defined by someone’s standards of success.  For example, in the work place promotion can be one of the cultural standards of success.

My answer to this question is “I have had a wonderful life and it has met all my success objectives.”  Early in my career I asked myself what success meant to me.  I have always defined success as a great career, a long and good marriage, and raising my children to be self-sufficient adults.  There were many other things I could have defined as successful but I knew I had to make choices in life.  The choices I made had consequences.  For my career to advance, I had to move from my initial location.  My husband had a prosperous business that was not easily transferred.  We started a long distance relationship.  This was a difficult choice but if I hadn’t moved, I never would have had the opportunity to achieve my career objectives.  All choices have consequences.  Knowing what you want out of life, understanding the consequences of your choices, and being okay with them is a foundational requirement for having what you want.

Posted By: Mary Anne Gale

CultureCulture has such a dramatic impact on our lives.  When we were born we had no bias or prejudices.  From the first moment, we are surrounded with love, isolation, or possibly fear.  From that moment forward we begin to form opinions about others and ourselves. Throughout our lives these ideas gets reinforced and even come with us into adulthood.  Sometimes they are subconscious and other times; they are consciously reinforced by society.  For example:  women are bombarded with ads that define beauty as thin.

Cultural messages also impact us in the workplace.  Asians are taught to be humble and respect authority.  These are great virtues but in the work place they are played out as not talking in public meetings or constructively challenging the boss or people in higher positions. This gives them a disadvantage in a Euro-centric work environment where sharing your opinion and providing feedback is expected.

Posted By: Mary Anne Gale

Building genuine relationships is critical to your life’s success.  We all know it is easy to have acquaintances.  These are the people that you meet at a cocktail party and you enjoy the conversation but may never see them again.  Genuine relationships are those relationships that are built on trust and confidence in the each other.  They develop after several experiences and interactions in a variety of situations.

In the workplace, it is important to build strong relationships.  The boss is a key person but the bosses boss and the bosses peers are also critical people in the decision making process that can impact your career.  You do this by working with them on projects, asking for their input on a problem or issue, inviting them to lunch or coffee, sharing your personal career objectives and getting their thoughts based on their experiences, etc.  It takes work and effort to invest in building relationships at work but they will pay off in the long run.

Posted By: Mary Anne Gale

Support, how do we get by without it?  We each need to have a support system that helps us get through life.  When you are working to build your career support becomes an even more important ingredient to your success.  Everyone should have a list of people that support you.  The roles range from caring critic, coach, sponsor, mentor to babysitter, finance advisor, housekeeper, etc.  There also needs to be an emergency list.  For many of us who don’t live near family, finding those emergency helpers is so important to our sanity and well-being.

A simple exercise is to list the roles that you need to have support and begin listing people who you would use for the different types of support you need.  Check to make sure that you have several people in each support role.  Once you have completed the list, begin to develop strategies to fill in the gaps.  For example, if you are short on emergency baby sitters begin to ask at work, church, around the neighborhood for babysitters, work at home moms, grandmothers or older people willing to help out on short notice.

At work you need to make sure that you are building the relationships with the key people who can help you reach your career objectives.

Posted By: Mary Anne Gale

This week, I was working with an individual who is struggling with his boss. The individual is frustrated because the boss doesn’t appear to be interested in him. The boss lives in a different city than the employee and they only see each other about once a year. Phone calls are usually monthly but often are skipped.

Long-distance bosses are increasingly becoming a reality. This is difficult because the boss is an important conduit to his or her boss, who is the decision maker about your career. So, here are some suggestions to help you keep your boss up-to-date on your work.

  1. Email your boss regularly to keep him updated on your work. ou don’t need to copy everything you do but be sure to send him all the important documents. Ask for his advice and coaching help If your boss has a lot of reports, you need to take the initiative to make contact.
  2. Invite the boss to visit you more often or schedule visits to meet with him. Build strong relationships with the people you are working with and for. They can provide important input to the boss and they can advocate for you.

Don’t let distance be a problem. Turn it into a positive and find creative ways to keep your boss informed of all your great work.

Posted By: Mary Anne Gale

People often ask me, “How were you able to have it all?”  I am always stunned by the question because “all” means different things to everyone.  “All” is society’s definition of success. For many people, “all” means that you have had a successful career, family life, and community or social life, as defined by someone’s standards of success. For example, in the work place promotion can be one of the cultural standards of success.

My answer to this question is “I have had a wonderful life and it has met all my success objectives.” Early in my career I asked myself what success meant to me. I have always defined success as a great career, a long and good marriage, and raising my children to be self-sufficient adults. here were many other things I could have defined as successful but I knew I had to make choices in life. The choices I made had consequences. For my career to advance, I had to move from my initial location. My husband had a prosperous business that was not easily transferred. We started a long distance relationship. This was a difficult choice but if I hadn’t moved, I never would have had the opportunity to achieve my career objectives. All choices have consequences. Knowing what you want out of life, understanding the consequences of your choices, and being okay with them is a foundational requirement for having what you want.

Posted By: Mary Anne Gale

I hope you like the face of my Web site. I decided to give it a facelift and share my other services along with my book. John Peretz is my project manager and he has done a fabulous job creating something that is technically up-to-date and showcases content in a modern Web site design.

I haven’t been much of a blogger but I have decided that it is important to get my message out and also learn from others.

I will be writing once each week and look forward to getting your feedback and ideas you would like me to discuss. Writing the book was the beginning of my new journey, but I love speaking, coaching, and presenting workshops. These have opened up new opportunities for me and my exciting second career. A friend recently told me, “You are not retiring but, rather, are graduating to a new passion.” It is true and being your own boss isn’t so bad either!